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Physico chemistry of solids, thin films, biotechnologies
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SEMINAR LMGP - 12.05.2020 - Guillaume LEFEBVRE

Published on April 28, 2020
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Seminar May 12, 2020
at 2 p.m. - by visioconference

The protective effect of surfactants on monoclonal antibody stability depends on the material surface

Guillaume LEFEBVRE

Guillaume LEFEBVRE

Guillaume LEFEBVRE
PhD student, LMGP and Sanofi

Abstract

During the production, purification, storage, transportation and delivery of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), the stability of the drug is challenged in many ways, particularly by its exposure to diverse interfaces to which it can adsorb. Pharmaceutical industries address protein adsorption and aggregation issues during drug formulation optimization by adding surface-active excipients, such as polysorbate 80 or 20. However, there is still a need to better understand adsorption of proteins and surfactants at interfaces and provide new screening methods to assess material compatibility of early drug candidates.

In our study, we use Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging (SPRi), ELISA and Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM-d), as techniques to measure the absorption and desorption kinetics of mAbs and surfactants on different surfaces. We compare hydrophobicity and surface crystallinity and demonstrate that, beyond hydrophobicity, the nature of the material surface affects the protective role of polysorbate 80 in mAb formulations.

These results demonstrate that it is necessary to consider the material in the formulation optimization.
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Date of update April 28, 2020

Université Grenoble Alpes